Love TV Series

  

Love TV Series

Love is an American romantic comedy web television series consisting in three seasons, which were aired on Netflix. Cready by Judd Apatow, Lesley Arfin, and Paul Rust, the tv series features Gillian Jacobs, Paul Rust, and Claudia O'Doherty.

The TV series tells the story of Mickey and Gus, played by Jacobs and Rust, respectively, and the trajectory of their relationship, with the exhilarations and humiliations of intimacy and commitment. Their story is presented as a “down-to-earth look at dating” and it explores male and female perspectives on romantic relationships through the main characters.
The series has received positive reviews from critics, with the cast receiving most of the praise. Rotten Tomatoes' critical consensus states, “Judd Apatow's Love is an honest look at building a relationship, helped along by its two appealing leads.”
Although The Hollywood Report and Variety praise the show in general, they have criticized the 40 minute-length of the episodes. Daniel Fienberg at The Hollywood Reporter wrote, “it's a variation on a common theme, but it's also squirmingly effectively, fitfully funny and carried by a great, uncompromising performance from Gillian Jacobs… If you can warm up to the prickly, but probably realistic, characters, there's a lot to like, if not love.”
Meanwhile Alan Sepinwall of Hitfix praised the show and said, “I can see all those issues, and more. I just don't care. When you feel it - as I very quickly did with Love - nothing else matters.”
Rotten Tomatoes also evaluated the TV series second season: “In its sophomore season, Love treads the balance between comedy and drama with greater confidence, going deeper into the endearing, frustrating, delightfully realistic relationship of Mickey and Gus.”
Did you know that Iris Apatow, who plays Arya, is the daughter of Judd Apatow, the executive producer of the show? The TV series has many other interesting facts, such as the long flight of stairs Mickey and Gus walk up in the second episode of the first season, which is the same one that Laurel and Hardy carried the piano up in The Music Box (1932).
If Dave “Gruber” Allen and Steve Bannos sound familiar, that is because they previously appeared on “Freaks & Geeks” which was written and produced by Judd Apatow. The two actors played supporting roles in the TV series, a high school math teacher and a high school guidance counselor respectively.
Love features a show within a show called Witchita, which is about women who become witches when they reach puberty. It appears that Madchen Amick leaves in a supernatural world, because she wasn't only picked up to play a witch on the show within the show Witchita, but she also played a witch on the Lifetime series Witches of the East End. The fact that she was casted to play an actress that plays a witch within the show is quite comical as, in real life, she does play a witch.
In the first two seasons, the Sony Pictures Studios in Culver City, CA was used as Gus' workplace, Mar Vista Studios. However, in the third season, they used 20th Century Fox Studios in Los Angeles instead. Meanwhile, Gus' Springwood apartment is actually Oakwood apartments in Studio City, CA.
If the pool that Mickey jumps into in the fourth episode of the first season, “Party in the Hills”, it's because the same pool was used in the film Almost Famous, which is where Billy Crudup jumped in upon announcing the line, “I am a golden God!”
Some of the best quotes from the show includes Mickey rejecting conventional character archetypes: “Surprise! I'm not the cool girl. I'm not just some girl you can fuck for a while to prove to yourself that you can be dangerous and edgy and you're not some huge dork.”
Or some of the ugly truths Robin Tunney, who plays a sex addict named Waverly, tells Mickey: “We are all still that 12-year-old girl who felt like she would die because she really wanted a boyfriend and couldn't get one.”
Spoiler alert! Liz Shannon Miller reviewed the final season of Love positively. “In real life, the end of a love story is rarely a happy one, which is why perhaps it's good that Netflix's Love has chosen to wrap things up,” she wrote. “The third season of the series created by Paul Rust, Lesley Arfin, and Judd Apatow has always been a grounded, near-cynical take on what it means to seek out romance in modern-day Los Angeles. But the series has always been, like many Apatow joints, easy to consume even when things get brutally awkward, thanks to the pervasive tone of an indie romantic comedy (something that may be the result of its director roster including Joe Swanberg, Lynn Shelton, and Michael Showalter).”

 

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