Pulp Fiction as a cult film

  

Pulp Fiction as a cult film

Although Pulp Fiction's main characters are a group of unapologetic criminals, this 1994 American crime film has been recognised as one of the best films of all times. The film was written and directed by Quentin Tarantino, and starring John Travolta, Samuel L. Jackson, Bruce Willis, Ving Rhames, and Uma Thurman.

Based on a story by Tarantino and Roger Avary, the film's title alludes to the pulp magazines and hardboiled crime novels that were popular during the mid-20th century. Graphic violence and punchy dialogue are the trademark of this kind of magazines and novels.
The film is atypical is many ways. To start with, the plot is presented out of chronological order, humour is presented in contrast with severe violence, and the film is also self-referential in some instances. Rather than presenting the dialogue to serve the plot, it is conceived to give an insight into the character's perspectives, which is rather unconventional. It is so unconventional that Columbia TriStar allegedly turned the script down for being “too demented” but luckily Miranda picked it up and fully financed it.
The odds were in their favour, and upon its release, it was a major critical and commercial success. Apart from being well received by the masses, it was also praised critically, and it was nominated for seven Oscars, while Tarantino Avery were awarded the Best Original Screenplay. Its commercial and critical success had a major effect on the field of independent cinema and has been described as a touchstone of postmodern film.
Pulp Fiction has also become a turning point for postmodern film and it has influenced several movies, which have a adopted a myriad of elements of its style. The film has listed as one of the greatest films ever made by Entertainment Weekly and 2008, and it was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress, deemed “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant.”
It scored 94% based on 79 reviews at Rotten Tomatoes, and the website describes it as “one of the most influential films of the 1990s, Pulp Fiction is a delirious post-modern mix of neo-noir thrills, pitch-black humour, and pop-culture touchstones.”
Critics have also responded well to the film. Roger Ebert of the Chicago Sun-Times described it as “so well-written in a scruffy, fanzine way that you want to rub noses in it - the noses of those zombie writers who take ‘screenwriting' classes that teach them the formulas for ‘hit films.'”
Richard Corliss of TIME wrote, “It towers over the year's other movies as majestically and menacingly as a gang lord at a preschool. It dares Hollywood films to be this smart about going this far. If good directors accept Tarantino's implicit challenge, the movie theatre could again be a great place to live in.” David Ansen of Newsweek also wrote, “The miracle of Quentin Tarantino's Pulp Fiction is how, being composed of secondhand, debased parts, it succeeds in gleaming like something new.”
Owen Gleiberman of Entertainment Weekly wrote, “You get intoxicated by it, high on the rediscovery of how pleasurable a movie can be. I'm not sure I've encountered a filmmaker who combined discipline and control with sheer wild-ass joy the way that Tarantino does.” Meanwhile, Peter Travers of Rolling Stone wrote, “There's a special kick that comes from watching something this thrillingly alive. Pulp Fiction is indisputably great.”
Variety also reflected on its impact on Hollywood. Accordingly, Pulp Fiction was a game changer for so-called independent cinema and “it cemented Miramax's place as the reigning indie superpower,” writes Biskind. “Pulp Fiction became the Star Wars of independents, exploding expectations for what an indie film could do at the box office.” This is referring to the fact that the film had a massive financial return on its small budget, transforming the industry's attitude toward the indies.
Some of its famous quotes include:
“Just because you are a character doesn't mean that you have character,” - The Wolf. “If my answers frighten you then you should cease asking scary questions,” - Jules Winnfield. “Play with matches, you get burned,” - Vincent Vega. “Any time of the day is a good time for pie,” - Fabienne. “Uncomfortable silences. Why do we feel it's necessary to yak about bullshit in order to be comfortable?” - Mia Wallace.

 

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